POST FRAME CONSTRUCTION

Stick-Frame Construction: This is the traditional home building method. The frame of the building is generally built over a basement with the framing studs and trusses every 16” or 24” on center. The stud wall construction transfers the load to the foundation.

 

Post-Frame Construction: Historically used for pole barns and rural buildings, post-frame construction has the framing built 8’ on center. Post-frame construction uses large posts and trusses that transfers the load into the ground or are built directly on a concrete slab.

Pros & Cons of a Post-Frame Home

Pros:

  • Post-frame homes have a lower cost for the foundation because they are generally built on a concrete slab instead of a basement foundation. The concrete floor can be added after the posts have been embedded into the ground or the posts can be anchored directly to the concrete slab. 

  • Post-frame homes have superior energy efficiency. A stick-frame home has studs every 16” to 24” on center. This allows less space for insulation and creates more places to transfer heat and cold. With a post-frame home, the posts are 8’ or more apart for more insulation and less heat transfer.

  • Post-frame homes don’t require interior support walls. The “frame” in post-frame buildings consists of the posts and trusses creating one structural unit. This creates large open spaces in the house and wider openings for doors and windows.

  • A post-frame home is constructed quicker than a traditional stick-built home. With less framing work the labors savings are passed on as part of the final project costs.

  • Generally post-frame buildings are constructed with steel panels on the exterior. These panels offer very little maintenance that many home owners enjoy.

  • Many post-frame residential buildings are built for “do-it-yourself” individuals. They are interested in the plans and building shell so that they can finish the interior of the building.

 

Cons:

  • A Post-frame home can be cheaper. But that depends on what you are designing as a final project. Giving up a basement will save on foundation costs. Post-frame uses less materials than stick-frame to save a little more. Plumbing, electrical, drywall, kitchen and bathroom work will all cost the same. Depending on your final design, the costs savings may be negligible.

  • Depending on your location, permitting can be an issue for post-frame homes. Zoning boards may not allow steel siding or post frame homes. 

  • Lenders and appraisers may struggle with how to value a post-frame home. But because of this, many find it easier to identify their building as “wood framed” instead of post-frame when working with an assessor.

  • In order to qualify for a Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac mortgage, at least 50% of the project must be living space and a concrete footing below the ground level is required.

Once you've made your decision, schedule some time to meet with a MB&R's Buildings' Manager. They can walk you through your many different options or you can view some of our past projects for ideas. 

 

Bardominium Construction

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Sample 1

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Sample 6

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Garage / Office / Church

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Work Shop

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2 Car Garage

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Garage - Office

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Agriculture Buildings 

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